MedicineLogo

H4H

       

Homeopathy 4 Health

The alternative medical modality of holistic, natural,

safe, individualised, side-effect-free and affordable health care

Hermes once separated two serpents entwined in mortal combat to bring about peace. These serpents were later included in the medical Caduceus as a sign of wellbeing.


HomeButton

History&BasicsButton

HomeopathicButton

WorldwideButton

YourBenefitsButton

YourConsultationButton

Testimonials&ResearchButton

Criticisms&RepliesButton

News&ViewsButton

H4HMonographsButton

F.A.Q.Button

LinksButton

SiteMapButton

WhoIAmButton

CodeofEthicsButton

AcknowledgementsButton

ContactButton

ReeButton.comButton

site stats

You are viewing: Homeopathics - Allium-cepa - Contemporary - Level 3
returnButton 
to Homeopathics - Allium-cep - Level 2

Brought to you by:
ish logo. Click for full text
Allium cepa

Brought to you by:
Hpathy logo. Click for full text
Allium cepa

Allium cepa
Onion (Liliacecae)

History
The onion (or allium) family is a large and diverse one containing over 500 species. With such a large range of species the origins of the modern (or globe) onion are a bit blurred. It has not one but five possible wild plants it could have evolved from, all of which grow in the central Asian region.

Scroll right for Remedy Headers - Allium  cepa >>>>

It is thought that bulbs from the onion family have been utilised as a food source for millennia. In Palestinian Bronze Age settlements traces of onion remains were found along side fig and date stones dating back to 5000 BC! It would be pure conjecture to suggest these were cultivated onions. The archaeological and literary evidence suggests cultivation probably took place around two thousand years later in ancient Egypt. This happened alongside the cultivation of leeks and garlic and It is thought
that the slaves who built the pyramids were fed radishes and onions.

It may come as no surprise that it was the Romans who introduced the onion family to Europe. The origins of its name are also Roman or at least Latin. The Late Latin name unio was used to describe a species of onion resembling a single white pearl. This was later formed the basis for the French, Oignon and then later the English, Onion.

Why Does the Onion Family Smell? All closely related plants to the onion, (Leeks, Shallots, Garlic, Chives etc) contain thioallyl compounds or allicins. When cut or crushed the allicin (an amino acid), within the garlic or onion is converted by an enzymatic reaction into allicin, this quickly breaks down into sulphide compounds. Sulphide compounds are aromatic and this is what gives all the plants in the onion family their distinctive smell. So to put it simply -

The onion family stinks because of a chemical change from allicin to sulphide compounds and sulphur stinks.

Onion Family Health and Nutrition
Garlic (allium sativa) contains by far the highest concentration of allciins and it has been used
medicinally for centuries and was used as an antiseptic since classical times. The Romans often
used garlic and would drink a solution of around 5-10 bulbs boiled down in a small bucket of wine
for a hangover cure.

It has also been found that allicins can prevent the growth of malignant cells. In other words they are
an anti-carcinogen and can help prevent the growth of cancerous cells in animals. It has been documented that in areas of high garlic and onion consumption rates of stomach cancer are relatively low.

There is mounting evidence that all members of the onion family have a positive effect in lowering incidences of heart disease. Trials in the mid-nineties showed a drop in cholesterol levels of a test group when given garlic powder.

It would appear that onions play a much more important anti-carcinogen or cardioprotective role than a nutritional one (see below). However they do add a distinctive flavour, smell and texture to many meals and form the initial stage in many recipes.

TopButton


 

Allium Cepa.
Onion (Liliacecae)

Acute catarrhal inflammation of mucous membranes, with increased secretion. Catarrhal dull headache, with coryza; < in the evening, > in open air; < on returning to a warm room (compare, Euph., Puls.). Headache ceases during menses; returns when flow disappears (Lach., Zinc.). Eyes: burning, biting, smarting as from smoke, must rub them; watery and suffused; capillaries injected and excessive lachrymation. Coryza: profuse, watery and acrid nasal discharge, with profuse, bland lachrymation (profuse, full of acrid tears, bland and fluent coryza, Euph.). Acrid, watery discharge dropping from tip of nose (Ars., Ars. iod.). Spring coryza: after damp northeasterly winds; discharge burns and corrodes nose and upper lip. Hay fever; in August every year; violent sneezing on rising from bed; from handling peaches. Nasal polypus (Mar. v., Sang., Sang. nit., Psor.). Catarrhal laryngitis; cough compels patient to grasp the larynx; seems as if cough would tear it. Colic: from cold by getting feet wet; over eating; from cucumbers; salads; haemorrhoidal; of children; <sitting, > moving about. Neuralgic pains like a long thread; in face, head, neck, chest. Traumatic chronic neuritis; neuralgia of stump after amputation; burning and stinging pains. Panaritia: with red streaks up the arm; pains drive to despair; in child-bed. Sore and raw spots on feet, especially heel, from friction. Efficacious when feet are rubbed sore - Dioscorides. Phlebitis, puerperal; after forceps delivery.

Relationship. - Complementary: Phos., Puls., Thuja. Compatible: before Cal. and Sil. in polypus. Similar: to, Euph., but coryza and lachrymation are opposite. Bad effects from getting wet (Rhus).

Aggravation. - Predominantly in the evening and in warm room (Puls. - in open air, Euph.).

Amelioration. - In cold room and open air (Puls.).

TopButton

Photo Onion 
Kingdom: Plant
Latin Name: Allium cepa
Common Name: Onion
Homeopahtic
: Allium-cep

Return Button
to Homeopathics - Level 1

Remedy Headers 
Brought to you by:
Logo Spiritindia.com
Allium cepa

1. Acute catarrhal inflammation of mucous membranes, with increased secretion.

2. Catarrhal dull headache, with coryza; agg. in the evening, amel. in open air; agg. on returning to a warm room (compare, Euph., Puls.).

3. Headache ceases during menses; returns when flow disappears (Lach., Zinc.).

4. Eyes: burning, biting, smarting as from smoke, must rub them; watery and suffused; capillaries injected and excessive lachrymation.

5. Coryza: profuse, watery and acrid nasal discharge, with profuse, bland lachrymation (profuse, full of acrid tears, bland and fluent coryza, Euph.).

6. Acrid: watery discharge dropping from tip of nose (Ars.,) Ars. iod).

Spring coryza: after damp northeasterly winds; discharge burns and corrodes nose and upper lip.

7. Hay fever: in August every year; violent sneezing on rising from bed; from handling peaches.

8. Nasal polypus: (Mar. v., Sang., Sang. nit., Psor.).

9. Catarrhal laryngitis; cough compels patient to grasp the larynx; seems as if cough would tear it.

10. Colic; from cold by getting feet wet; overeating; from cucumbers; salads; hemorrhoidal; of children; agg. sitting, amel. moving about.

11. Neuralgic pains like a long thread; in face, head, neck, chest.

12. Traumatic chronic neuritis; neuralgia of stamp after amputation; burning and stinging pains.

13. Panaritia: with red streaks up the arm; pains drive to despair; in child - bed.

14. Sore and raw spots on feet, especially heel, from friction.

15. Phlebitis, puerperal; after forceps delivery.

16. Relation. Complementary: Phos., Puls., Thuja.

17. Compatible: before, Cal. and Sil. in polypus.

18. Similar: to, Euph., but coryza and lachrymation are opposite.

19. Bad effects from getting wet (Rhus).

20. Aggravation. Predominantly in the evening and in warm room (Puls - in open air, Euph.).

21. Amelioration. In cold room and open air (Puls.).
TopButton




 

Home | History & Basis | Homeopathics | Worldwide | Your Benefits | Your Consultation | Testimonials & Research |
Criticisms & Replies | News & Views | H4H Monographs | F.A.Q. | Links | Site Map | Who I Am | Code of Ethics | Acknowledgements | Contact