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You are viewing: H4H Monographs - Trauma - Fear - Level 2
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to H4H Monographs - Level 1

H4H Monograph

Trauma
Fear

Expressed Fear
Expressed fear

Scroll right for pictures of various fear conditions  >>>>>>>

Trauma
Introduction

Trauma
Anxiety/ Phobia

Trauma
Fear

Trauma
Grief/loss

Trauma
Injuries
(breaks & fractures)

Trauma
Injuries
(muscles|

Trauma
Birthing

Trauma
Fear

Expressed Fear
Expressed fear

1. Fear - Definitions and Differences

Trauma refers to the symptoms of mental or emotional shock following a stressful event or physical injury. The word shock is used differently by the medical community and the general public. The connotation by the public is an intense emotional reaction to a stressful situation or bad news. The medical condition is defined as a condition where the tissues in the body don't receive enough oxygen and nutrients to allow the cells to function. This ultimately leads to cellular death, progressing to organ failure, and finally, if untreated, whole body failure and death.

Fear on the other hand is a mental and emotional response on account of a present and actual danger based upon previous experience, knowledge or trigger happening event

Fear differs from Anxiety in that Anxiety is a mental and emotional response on account of an anticipatory danger which may or may not exist. It reveals itself as an awareness of heightened tensions and body tone, apprehension, disquiet, unease, all of which are felt to be a threat to the security of the individual. Typical examples are stage fright, a change of circumstances, disapproval, rejection, embarrassment, commitment, air flight, snakes, spiders etc etc.

2. Fear - Background

Expressed Fear
Expressed fear

Fear is probably the most prolific and predominant human emotion. That this is so is evident from a study of history in the folk lore, myth, and human experience down the ages. Fear is an underlying, motive in religion, in politics, in social customs and behaviour, stemming from man's determined desire for survival.

Fear is the response to threat. Any kind of threat or menace calls forth an immediate response on the part of the individual thus put at risk. The threat may be to the person, endangering life or limb; it may be threat to the pocket, presaging financial loss or ruin; it may be a threat to prestige involving damage to reputation or social disgrace.

Faced by immediate threat the primitive reaction is either a desire to run away, escape, to take refuge in flight or to resist, to fight, to take counter action. Perhaps neither course may be possible, but in any case the one threatened cannot but react to the situation. Later a feeling of anger may pervade which in turn may bet overtaken by a feeling of hate for it is natural to hate what is feared and to desire its removal or destruction.

The response of threat has both a physical and a psychological component. The physical reason is evidenced by endocrine activity giving rise to vasomotor and neuromuscular disturbance. The countenance may blanch or blush - going white with fear or purple with rage. The eyes may blaze with fury or dilate with horror. The skeletal muscles may tense in preparation for flight or fight, or the limbs may become paralysed and powerless, causing the victim to become "rooted to the spot". Sometimes this type of response may prove a protective manoeuvre, when any movement is provocative of increased danger. On Occasion, as when faced by a cobra poised to strike, it is safer to "freeze" than to flee.

Other physical concomitants of the reaction are gooseflesh - hair stands on end; increase in rate of heart beat, palpitation; outpouring of cold sweat; acceleration of peristalsis - looseness of bowels; aphonia or dysarthria; dryness of the mouth; loss of appetite. Accompanying these physical signs and associated intimately with them is the psychological emotion of either anger or fear, but initially, predominantly and most persistently that of fear. The persistence of fear is not merely a matter of emotional distress; by reason of accompanying disturbance of physiological function it is also inimical to health and well being.

3. Fear Classification

Suppressed Fear
Suppressed fear


As already described there are basically two ways the individual to responds the threat of fear ie fight or flight In diagnostic terms these two responses are referred to as Concealed Fear and Expressed Fear

i) Suppressed Fear
This is where the individual bottles up and denys the problem threat, feelings and emotion are suppressed and the individual exhibits an outward deceptive calm and control. To friends and family everything appears normal. Such concealment can be dangerous and lead ultimately to a suicide attempt in a move to draw attention to their plight.

ii) Expressed Fear
This is where it is plain to see the distress and anguish on the face of the person concerned. Physically the face may be flushed, there is an inability to relax, rest or sleep, the person displays a high degree of agitation, sweat is prominent and mentally the person is inattentive, preoccupied and withdrawn.

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4. Homeopathic Remedies
i) Suppressed Fear - Main remedy
Cuprum metallicum (Cu)
Here the patient is strong willed and mentally strong but because of their mental strength they try to control their lives at every turn so as not to let their fear gain the upper hand. This makes them inflexible, respectful of rules, cautious, hard working, planners of everything, good organisers, and successful at work and business. Because their emotions are kept under such tight wraps they often suffer from overexertion resulting in physical and mental exhaustion, and tension.

The causation of this condition is a lack of approbation, constant disapproval and a too high expectation of them from their parents resulting in an undermining of self confidence. This in turn results in a fear of retribution against which, as already mentioned, they exercise a purposeful strength to control every aspect of their life in an attempt to gain approval and avoid criticism and reprimand.

Other Remedies
Ars, Caust, Gel, Phos, Nat-m

ii) Expressed Fear Main remedy
Carsinosinum (Cars)
Weak and timid as a result of which the person has little will power of their own but just goes with the flow causing the minimum disturbance in an attempt to get by without notice.
They are extremely fearful of failure, of making mistakes, of being reproached,. All this combines to make them unable to say no, to feel guilty when questioned, to feel less worthy than others, to be able to stand up for themselves and not capable of performing to a level expected by others.

Other Remedies
Ars, Borax, Bry, Calc-c, Iod

What should I do next?
Contact Dr. Peter Darashah and discuss your concerns with him.
Should  treatment be advisable a consultation can be readily arranged either
in person or through eConsultation.

Dr. Peter Darashah

Ph.D.,M.Sc (Lond), B.Sc., DIHom (Pract),FBIH, MARH

Nutrition Consultant & Homeopathic Physician

(087) 2621943
Consultations held at:
Dervish Holistic Cebtre, 50 Cornmarket Str., Cork.

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Expressed Fear
Expressed Fear

Expressed Fear
Expressed Fear

Suppressed Fear
Suppressed Fear

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